How to prune overgrown fruit trees

How to prune overgrown fruit trees


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Not sure when or how to prune your fruit trees? For helpful tips about growing fruit trees in Northern Virginia , see these articles:. Many trees in our urban and suburban environment benefit from regular pruning. But fruit trees, in particular, need regular — and proper — pruning. You can prune commonly-grown Northern Virginia fruit trees such as apple, pear, or cherry at any time of year, especially if there are structural problems or damage that needs to be fixed. However, there are a few things to keep in mind during different seasons.

Content:
  • Cooperative Extension: Tree Fruits
  • How To Prune An Overgrown Apple Tree
  • Summer prune fruit trees
  • Fedco Trees Tips for Renovating Old Apple Trees
  • Diarmuid Gavin: Making the cut - how to prune your fruit trees
  • YOU CAN STILL ADD MORE!
  • Summer Fruit Tree Pruning
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to Prune Fruit Trees The Right Way Every Time

Cooperative Extension: Tree Fruits

To grow the most varieties of fruit on my small suburban lot, I am experimentally trying a technique called Backyard Orchard Culture developed by the fruit tree-growers at Dave Wilson Nursery. In Backyard Orchard Culture, pruning is not optional. You pick the mature height of the tree — typically 6 to 8 feet so that all pruning and harvesting can be done from the ground — and you keep it that size with frequent pruning. Luckily, pruning a fruit tree from terra firma is pretty easy.

So I have not found maintaining my Backyard Orchard to be particularly difficult or time consuming. I just get out my hand pruners, walk to the orchard and start cutting things down to size. I can prune the core of the mini orchard — 16 trees about to be expanded to 24 in about an hour, depending on how methodical I get. I know a lot of people feel very intimidated by pruning. There seem to be two types of new pruners: those who are unwilling to cut anything out of a tree for fear that they will kill the tree, and those who will happily take a Sawzall to their tree and just whack away at anything.

Both approaches lead to poor outcomes. There are as many ways to prune a tree as there are gardeners with Felcos. Everything in this article is based upon what I do based on my goals for high-density, size-limited fruit tree production. If you have stately foot tall apple trees and 27 acres on which to grow, this stuff will probably not apply to you. Typically, fruit tree pruning is thought of as a dormant season winter activity. Almost all methods of training fruit trees require dormant pruning.

Dormant pruning has some real advantages. When a tree has lost its leaves you can see the structure of the tree, you can make cuts to correct the shape more easily. So, with Backyard Orchard Culture, winter pruning is important. We want a strong, solid scaffold for our fruit trees, and this is achieved by careful detail pruning in winter.

But winter pruning is not about size control of the tree, and if you try to winter prune for size control you will quickly be in a terrible battle with your tree, because you will be sending it very mixed signals. To understand why, spend some time really internalizing this: trees strive to balance their root mass and their leaf canopy.

From Spring through late Summer, a deciduous tree is actively growing both leaves and branches the canopy and its underground root structure. Sometimes this means root dieback, sometimes this means canopy expansion. So, if you let a tree grow all summer without any pruning, the tree captures all that solar energy and converts this into a strong, expanded root structure. The result is typically water sprouts, ugly, straight-up branches that a tree can grow quickly and hang a lot of leaves on.

Time to regrow with vigor! Make more branches! Make more leaves! Think of a red twig dogwood with lovely bright red new growth. You encourage that new growth by being aggressive with your winter pruning. Aggressive to the point that you might just hack the whole thing to the ground every few years in February. But if our goal is a small fruit tree, aggressive winter pruning works against us. On the other hand, if you come through once or twice during the growing season and prune back some of the actively growing leaf mass — long, whippy, new growth branches, typically — you are limiting the vigor of a tree.

The leaf canopy and root development are checked together and stay more in balance. This makes it easier to maintain your tree at a comfortable, small, backyard-appropriate size. So, for size restriction of fruit trees, I am a big fan of summer pruning. As your tree grows and develops, if something is too long, or too tall, or sticking out too far, you just cut it off.

If you really feel you must have guidelines, cut back any whippy new growth by half. Reach up and cut off anything sticking up further than you can reach.

Typically, people under-prune their fruit trees. But you can go too far with limiting vigor, of course. A tree does need a leaf canopy to metabolize sunshine, after all. So think about your goals, and prune with them in mind. As the one with the pruning shears, have a far greater role in the final size of the tree than you might think. If you prune to an inward facing bud, you are telling the branch to grow in, towards the trunk of the tree. This reduces sunlight and airflow and greatly increases the possibility of branches rubbing or crossing.

The right rootstock for your soil and climatic conditions will make the growing of fruit trees far easier. If you live in a place with wetter soils, a rootstock that can tolerate that is important. If you live in a place with sandy soil and high winds, you want a rootstock that has excellent anchorage.

Many rootstocks are bred to be dwarfing — that is, to produce a tree that is smaller when full-grown. All this means is the the rootstock itself is size limiting. Remember that a tree cannot grow more canopy than its root system can support. Summer pruning helps reduce vigor from the top-down; Dwarfing rootstocks help reduce vigor from the bottom-up. However, I do still have to prune.

I garden, keep chickens and ducks, homeschool my two kids and generally run around making messes on my one-third of an acre in suburban Seattle. Thanks for reading! Having well-pruned trees is an important permaculture practice, si? It never crossed my mind as being a marketing ploy, but just a part of permaculture wisdom. Depends who you talk to. Some permaculture folks, like Sepp Holzer, do not prune at all.

There is an argument to be made that pruning is a lot of intervention and work, and that in a well-designed systems less work is better. I just planted 3 apple, three cherry, and three plum trees in three-tree, close triangles. Your summer vs winter pruning makes a lot of sense. How long have you been growing your trees in this dense configuration? Have you seen any of that?

The majority of the trees were planted in as whips just about 3 years ago. One of the reasons I went for multi-tree groups over multi-grafted trees in most cases was because I really noticed that vigor difference in a combo pear I put in years and years ago.

One grafted variety just swamped the others. I ended up yanking that tree because it was too much work to prune. With the start of our homestead, pruning is on my list of things to master soon! It has always seemed like a huge hurdle to learn. But you make it seem very easy. What a great explanation, thanks for the confidence booster! Just do it. Have you trained any as espalier trees? It seems like a great technique for small spaces. I have four espaliers and I bought them all as pre-formed, three-tier multi-grafts.

I have found them EASY to maintain. Super simple and quite productive. I have espaliered apples and pears along a fence line. I got ambitious and decided to do 5 levels of cordons — it took me 4 years to grow those out without any grafting.

Definitely a very space-efficient and potentially also very attractive way of growing fruit. I grow over 20 espaliered trees that I grafted in local classes and on my own. I have them in horizontal cordons.

Thanks for this Erica! I tried googling, but they all look like outward or upward or downward to me. The thing to remember is inward and outward are, in this case, relative terms about the location of the bud, not a description of how the bud looks.

Does that clarify? A little googleing suggests that there is a bonus section on the DVD about pruning, and there are a couple of YouTube videos also on the topic. I was really interested to see this when I watched the film. I thought maybe it was his way to retrain more mature trees to be easier to harvest and maintain? This is such a great summary of Backyard Orchard Culture! We put 16 trees about every 6 feet along a cement retaining wall that is topped by a pipe corral fence about 7 years ago.

We loosely espalier them and that has worked out well. In the beginning I pored over all the pruning guidelines, but now I just whack them back whenever them seem to be getting out of hand. The blossoms are beautiful in the spring. This system is brilliant! Thank you for this! I was just looking at the water sprouts on my lemon tree and the wobbly growth of my peach, and sighing over all the reading I was going to have to do.


How To Prune An Overgrown Apple Tree

Plums, Apricots, Peaches, Nectarines, Almonds and Cherries are all stonefruit and best pruned in summer when they finish fruiting. Number one is disease prevention — there are no silver leaf spores on the wing at this time of year. Number 2 — to slow down that crazy wild, stonefruit style cause pruning now elicits a less vigorous response lessening the amount of leggy watershoots the following season. For beginner pruners, a summer prune of your stonefruit is easier because you can see the true density of the canopy when all the leaves are on. The open centre of a vase lets the light pour in to ripen fruit and inspire productive wood. It also lets the air flow for best health. This low centre of gravity means that with annual pruning you can keep your fully grown tree to 3m — 4m.

Summer is the time to remove vigorous growth and keep the tree to a manageable size. Winter is the time to structurally prune and to.

Summer prune fruit trees

Do you have an old apple tree in the backyard? Now is a great time to rejuvenate it! Late winter is the best time to prune for several reasons: First, the tree is dormant and will suffer less shock. Second, pruning in late winter minimizes the exposure of wounded tissues to the ravages of winter. Third, diseases are less active in winter and you are less likely to spread diseases on your pruning tools. Wound dressings are not needed when pruning in the dormant season. This will make the tree easier to manage and the apples easier to harvest.

Fedco Trees Tips for Renovating Old Apple Trees

Not all fruiting plants require an annual prune, and some new dwarf cultivars of apples, peaches, apricots and nectarines have been bred to eliminate the need for annual pruning and maintenance. Click here for our Fruit Tree Espaliering Guide. Hi, can you please tell me what month to prune my lemon, lime and mandarin trees? Prune when your tree has finished fruiting but only in frost free regions. If you are in a frost prone area delay pruning as the soft new growth that regrows after pruning could get frosted and knock the tree back.

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Diarmuid Gavin: Making the cut - how to prune your fruit trees

Tree pruning is a skill that's never completely mastered. Just ask Michael Phillips, a longtime orchardist who's been grafting and growing apple trees at his Heartsong Farm for the last quarter-century. But that's one of the fascinating things about working with plants. Some years things go right; other years, not so much. But the more you do it, the more your confidence builds.

YOU CAN STILL ADD MORE!

More Information ». Training and pruning are essential for growing fruit successfully. Fruit size, quality and pest management are influenced by training and pruning. Untrained and unpruned trees become entangled masses of shoots and branches that produce little or no fruit and harbor insects and diseases. Training begins at planting and may be required for several years.

Restorative pruning can restore old, overgrown, and neglected trees into a good shape and productivity. It is better to restore an old neglected tree than to.

Summer Fruit Tree Pruning

Fruit trees require thinning and shaping for them to continue to produce fruit. Left to their own devices, they become overgrown and the fruit will be small and misshapen. It doesn't require a degree in horticulture to become good at pruning; practice makes perfect. Learning by doing is the best way to gain confidence.

RELATED VIDEO: How to Prune A Really Neglected Apple Tree

Nobody wants an overgrown apple tree in their backyards. When you leave the apple tree without cutting for a long time, it may become an over-grown apple tree. However, you can maintain the desired measurement of an overgrown apple tree by pruning. In addition, pruning the over-grown apple tree can encourage its growth. Pruning is an easy task though sometimes you need to follow a definite way to prune.

Proper pruning of your plants will ensure they are healthy and sized correctly for ease of harvest. Pruning also greatly influences fruit production and tree size and vigor.

To grow the most varieties of fruit on my small suburban lot, I am experimentally trying a technique called Backyard Orchard Culture developed by the fruit tree-growers at Dave Wilson Nursery. In Backyard Orchard Culture, pruning is not optional. You pick the mature height of the tree — typically 6 to 8 feet so that all pruning and harvesting can be done from the ground — and you keep it that size with frequent pruning. Luckily, pruning a fruit tree from terra firma is pretty easy. So I have not found maintaining my Backyard Orchard to be particularly difficult or time consuming. I just get out my hand pruners, walk to the orchard and start cutting things down to size.

This article appeared in the March issue of Horticulture Update , edited by Dr. William C. Pruning Peach Trees By Drs.